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HOMEPAGE

WHO’s WHO

WHAT WE DO

FIND A CLUB

NATURE OF THE DISABILITY

FORMING A CLUB

RULES, CONDITIONS OF PLAY, etc.

COACHING

COMPETITIONS AND TOURNAMENTS

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

RESULTS

LATEST NEWS AND LINKS

NEWSLETTERS

PHOTOS

DOCUMENTS: MARKER’S GUIDE SCORECARD

SITEMAP

Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.




HOMEPAGE

WHO’s WHO

WHAT WE DO

FIND A CLUB

NATURE OF THE DISABILITY

FORMING A CLUB

RULES, CONDITIONS OF PLAY, etc.

COACHING

COMPETITIONS AND TOURNAMENTS

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

RESULTS

LATEST NEWS AND LINKS

NEWSLETTERS

PHOTOS

DOCUMENTS: MARKER’S GUIDE SCORECARD

SITEMAP

MEMBERSHIP FORM

SIGHT CERT.


Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.


COACHING

1. The most important factor to bear in mind is that the majority of visually impaired people have absolutely no knowledge or, understanding of the game of bowls. In fact, a great many of them will never have played sport. So the very first thing to do is to sit down with the new pupil and, starting right at the beginning, explain the game in detail; discussing singles, pairs, triples and rinks. At an early stage establish whether they have any other physical disability or complaint which needs to be considered.

2. Explain that it is played on grass, artificial surface or indoor carpet and that the object of the game is to deliver as near as possible to a small white ball called a "jack". 3. Give a bowl to the pupil, let them handle and get the feel of it. Explain that because of it's peculiar construction it cannot run in a straight line to the jack, but must follow a curve.

4. Let them feel the running surface, the bias side and the non-bias side. To help the pupil differentiate between these two sides a small object such as a piece of Elastoplast may be affixed to the non-bias side. Tell the pupil that the bowls are either black or coloured and that all have distinctive markings.

5. The next step is to take the pupil to a bowling green and walk around with them describing the full layout both on the green and off. Explain that the green is 40-44 yards square. As each individual item is pointed out to the pupil, allow them to feel it for themselves, let them familiarise themselves with every part of the green, and with every item of equipment on the banks.

6. Explain that as a rule, the green is divided into six rinks each 19 feet wide on each of which a game is played. The rinks are numbered and the numbered discs are placed at each end on the bank and in line with the centre of the rink. It, is extremely important that these numbers are indicated to the pupil.

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