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Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.




HOMEPAGE

WHO’s WHO

WHAT WE DO

FIND A CLUB

NATURE OF THE DISABILITY

FORMING A CLUB

RULES, CONDITIONS OF PLAY, etc.

COACHING

COMPETITIONS AND TOURNAMENTS

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

RESULTS

LATEST NEWS AND LINKS

NEWSLETTERS

PHOTOS

DOCUMENTS: MARKER’S GUIDE SCORECARD

SITEMAP

MEMBERSHIP FORM

SIGHT CERT.


Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.


COACHING (Cont.)

17. The concentration of the bowler must also be respected.

18. The pupil should be taught to replace the mat in the standard position if they have played the latest wood, and must be encouraged to walk confidently the length of the green explaining that this is their rink and that there is nothing in the way.

19. The pupil must now again familiarise them self with the mat and find the centring string, which will give an accurate direction of the jack.

20. Continual practice and assistance must be given in the turning of the feet and the body so that the bowler is facing the right direction for either the forehand or backhand. In time the bowler will be able to make their own judgement.

21. The bowler is told to bring their bowling arm back, slightly behind their body, delivering the bowl about twelve inches in front of them and as close to the ground as possible, with their hand following through after the bowl has been released.

22. For the first few lessons be content to let the pupil develop the adopted technique which should be as simple and devoid of errors as possible so that your visually impaired bowler becomes a consistent bowler following the same pattern of delivery.

23. Right from the outset, using the clock technique, tell the bowler where their bowl has come to rest. You are their eyes and without telling them the end result of their delivery, there will be no fun in this game of bowls.

24. Week after week, and perhaps month after month, the pupil must be patiently coached. If possible, after satisfactory progress has been made, arrange to play the pupil in a match alongside sighted bowlers, one of whom should be delegated to describe the progress of a bowl and if necessary to help walk the green with the visually impaired bowler.

25. In these notes it is not possible to cover all the points which occur, but the coach, will in time, be able to pass on all sorts of tips he himself has acquired over the years.   CLICK HERE FOR NEXT PAGE

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