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Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.




HOMEPAGE

WHO’s WHO

WHAT WE DO

FIND A CLUB

NATURE OF THE DISABILITY

FORMING A CLUB

RULES, CONDITIONS OF PLAY, etc.

COACHING

COMPETITIONS AND TOURNAMENTS

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

RESULTS

LATEST NEWS AND LINKS

NEWSLETTERS

PHOTOS

DOCUMENTS: MARKER’S GUIDE SCORECARD

SITEMAP

MEMBERSHIP FORM

SIGHT CERT.


Visually Impaired Bowls England

WEBSITE KINDLY SPONSORED BY

REGISTERED CHARITY

No. 273134

Affiliated to I.B.B.A.


THE NATURE OF THE DISABILITY

Blindness or Partial sight are in each case a sensory loss.

The level of the disability varies widely, and is dependent upon two factors; (a) the degree of visual loss and (b) the level of compensation achieved by the more effective use of sensory inflows. It is important to observe that the level of visual acuity is not directly related to level of handicap. Some totally blind people are less handicapped than those who are partially sighted, due to the high degree of compensatory mechanism they are able to employ. On the other hand, the advantage of even the slightest amount of residual vision cannot be underestimated.

The degree of vision loss varies more widely than is first apparent.

People who are totally blind (with no perception of light) make up about 15% of the register, those almost totally blind (with perception of light) about 35% and the completion of the blind register is made up by those with 3/60th acuity. There is a similar register for the partially sighted, whose visual acuity is of a higher rating to that already mentioned, but it should be noted that admission to either register rests on the recommendation of a consultant. The registered partially sighted population of this country are largely affected by grossly defective vision, rather than blindness in the generally accepted sense of the word. This is one reason why there is a growing tendency to use the term "Visually Impaired" to describe those who are admitted to the registers. The statistics show that 2 out of 3 of those on the register are over the age of 65. Figures available show there are approximately 150,000 registered blind, and 85,000 partially sighted people in England, Scotland and Wales.

It is the responsibility of all those involved in the welfare of the blind, of all ages, to aim for the highest possible level of adjustment to the handicap. Rehabilitation programmes are geared for all ages, and each has a special place for sport as an important means for teaching some of the special skills which enable a visually impaired person to achieve independence. A visual impairment does not normally affect the fitness of the individual. The exception is retinal detachment where the condition prevents stooping, jerking of the head or lifting heavy weights for fear of jeopardising any remaining sight.



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